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  Viewing User Profile for: Tabby
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Joined: 07 Jan 2006 08:06 PM
Last Login: 28 Jul 2008 10:18 AM
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 Post Statistics
Tabby has contributed to 228 out of 1,757 total posts (12.98% of total).
Most Recent Posts:
Re: Building a relationship with an Indian Mother-in-Law 2/28/2006 11:38:54 AM   (Total replies: 0)
April, I just want to second what Dollmommy said because I think it's right on the mark. Before I became ill, I was trying to finish up my college degree while I was working full-time and in a serious with relationship with my now husband. Sometimes I just had so much stuff to get done for classes, I had to spend much less time with him (my husband now) so I could do a really good job on classwork and keep my GPA up. So I can see where Satya's coming from and it seems honorable to ...

Re: Building a relationship with an Indian Mother-in-Law 3/22/2006 6:01:58 PM   (Total replies: 1)
Since I'm not in a multi-cultural relationship, I really don't feel can respond to most of Fajita's post. However, I want to comment about your last line, "Having said that, whoever said all in-laws were perfect and like your own family". There's a lot of variation in the way things are done (parenting, family relationships, holiday celebrations, etc.) in the U.S., so even if you're American and you marry an American, there's still a good chance your in-laws will be completely different ...

Re: Building a relationship with an Indian Mother-in-Law 3/23/2006 11:40:38 AM   (Total replies: 1)
Hi Priya, It is nice to see you back. Even though you were here way before I was, I've enjoyed reading your posts - you always have great things to contribute. I did a big post earlier this morning but something happened and it went *poof*. Priya, I think you are right on a lot of things: personalities, attitudes, perceptions & also our own family prefences affect how we interact with our in-laws. With my in-laws, I try to not view what they do right now as being mean or nice to me, ...

Re: Building a relationship with an Indian Mother-in-Law 3/25/2006 3:39:17 PM   (Total replies: 0)
You did a really nice job with your post, Mel. :) I just wanted to add two things to your post. Counseling can be extremely helpful to anyone, but especially when it involves a marriage. You have someone who is trained to help people sort things out and is neutral, so I think they are more apt to be able to pull out key issues that can be muddled by emotions or by people taking sides. Part of Mel's last paragraph reminded me that I was going to say something about children and marriages ...

Re: Health Insurance need help and expert advice 1/28/2007 12:03:27 PM   (Total replies: 0)
Hey Rachel, I am going to try and help since no one has answered yet. I'm assuming you are in the U.S. (I think most developed nations have universal health care available through the government.) If you are getting health insurance by yourself, it can be extremely expensive and not provide really terrific coverage unless something catastrophic happens (major car accident, emergency surgery, etc.). I have a couple of relatives who are self-employed so they are self-insured and I know ...

Re: Henna 1/13/2006 10:45:25 AM   (Total replies: 1)
April, That's really cool that you make beauty products at home that are mostly vegetable-based. I try to use as much cruelty-free products as I can; almost all my beauty and personal care items are cruelty-free and/or non-animal product based as are quite a few of my cleaning products. Since we're talking about henna, has anyone tried Henna Penna? It looks like a magic marker, so probably would be easier to apply than mixing and putting henna in a cone to apply.

Re: Non-Indians Wearing Indian Clothing 2/23/2006 11:35:33 AM   (Total replies: 1)
I just wanted to chime in with Sabrina's post because I too have this natural need to not look like everyone else. I ordered my first salwar suit from Pardesi in late January and it arrived really quickly. I wore it for the first time outside of the house last Saturday at an Afghani restaurant with my husband and my parents. There was a table near us with East Asian (Afghani or Pakistani or Indian etc.) families; I believe all of the women there were wearing salwars. No one ever said ...

Re: Non-Indians Wearing Indian Clothing 2/23/2006 4:15:13 PM   (Total replies: 1)
Hey April, A bindi is the dot you see women wearing on their forehead, between the eyebrows/eyes. I think traditionally, it was a brown-red powder that was put on as a dot, but now you can get bindis that have self-adhesive and can just be a dot or be really bejeweled: glitter, crystals, pearls & stones (real or faux), etc. There's also bridal bindis where it's sort of an arch over the eyebrows and goes into a point between the eyes; there's probably a better term for this other than ...

Re: Non-Indians Wearing Indian Clothing 3/3/2006 10:52:20 AM   (Total replies: 1)
Mel, You know, I may be interested in trying on of these (the ready-made sarees). I think it was EG who said you really don't need one of these because it's not that hard to do a saree. But I've always been nervous about something happening like what happened to you (the saree coming undone in Boston) and the whole pleat part of it mystifies me. So, if I do end up getting one of these from Pardesi Fashions, I'll let everyone know what I think of it. Also, I wanted to mention that I ...

Re: Non-Indians Wearing Indian Clothing 4/11/2006 9:08:49 AM   (Total replies: 2)
Hey everyone, This is just my opinion, but I wanted to bring this up again in case we have any new readers who are a little nervous about wearing a salwar suit. It's easy when you're getting stared at to think the stares are hostile/threatening, but they may not be. Humans are really curious and if they see something new/different, so there's just the urge to check it out. In some cases, especially if you are in an area where there isn't an Indian population, other people may not even ...

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